Jeff Stern

Info snacks that I find tasty. More thoughtful stuff is put on jeffstern.wordpress.com.

Aug 20

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Jun 10
“How does one write about this place? Every sentence is open to dispute. Every place name objected to by someone. Every barely stated fact seems familiar already, at once tiresome and necessary. Whatever is written is examined not only for what it includes but for what it leaves out: have we acknowledged the horror of the Holocaust? The perfidy of the Palestinian Authority? The callousness of Hamas? Under these conditions, the dispossessed – I will leave aside all caveats and plainly state that the Palestinians are the dispossessed – have to spend their entire lives negotiating what should not be matters for negotiation at all: freedom of movement, the right to self-determination, equal protection under the law.” Teju Cole writing about traveling to the Palestine Festival of Literarature for the Financial Times http://on.ft.com/1hk8GwQ

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Jan 9
“There’s a kind of personal writing that argues for this kind of subjective experience that says, “I don’t have children and so it’s really important not to have children.” Or, “I do have children so it’s really important to have children.” Or, “I like cheese, so it’s really important to like cheese.” I never understand the point of that kind of writing. To me, you’re trying to find some objective position on your own experience, you know? Just because we felt it doesn’t mean that it matters at all. That’s my feeling.”

Zadie Smith in The Rumpus.

I tend to write like this because to quote Jo March, “This is what the newspapers want, Freidrich! Thrilling stories!”, but I would actually like to let Ms. Smith know that I would personally typify my style as actually being, “I don’t have children, so it’s really important to like cheese.”

So, there.

(via megsokay)

Yup. You’re both right. Cause you’re both saying the same thing, actually. 

That your subjective experience is completely unrelated to anybody else’s, really. Or even your own. Cause…whatever. Just write about it. 

(via stupidoldishlikelettersandsodas)

(via stupidoldishlikelettersandsodas)


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Dec 29
johncassavetes:

When Falk first offered Mikey and Nicky to Cassavetes, John agreed to do it so fast that Falk thought he wasn’t taking it seriously. When Falk told him he wanted to tell him the plot and give him a copy of the script, this is how Falk recounts Cassavetes’ outrageous reaction:
What do you think? I don’t know Elaine May can write? I don’t know you can act? You need to pitch it to me? You think I’m one of those businessmen! You think I am like you and have to have everything figured out before I begin something? That I have to have all the details in place? That I’m afraid to take a chance? That I have to play it safe? Elaine’s making it; you’re in it; that’s all I need to know. 

johncassavetes:

When Falk first offered Mikey and Nicky to Cassavetes, John agreed to do it so fast that Falk thought he wasn’t taking it seriously. When Falk told him he wanted to tell him the plot and give him a copy of the script, this is how Falk recounts Cassavetes’ outrageous reaction:

What do you think? I don’t know Elaine May can write? I don’t know you can act? You need to pitch it to me? You think I’m one of those businessmen! You think I am like you and have to have everything figured out before I begin something? That I have to have all the details in place? That I’m afraid to take a chance? That I have to play it safe? Elaine’s making it; you’re in it; that’s all I need to know. 

(via outlaw)


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Nov 29
Finishing up Wittgenstein’s Mistress in book club, and we tried reading the Tractatus as a prequel. Even with help from @greenideas, I’m pretty sure I didn’t get a lot of it.
But yeah, this philosophershaming tumblr is neat.

Finishing up Wittgenstein’s Mistress in book club, and we tried reading the Tractatus as a prequel. Even with help from @greenideas, I’m pretty sure I didn’t get a lot of it.

But yeah, this philosophershaming tumblr is neat.

(Source: philosophershaming)


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Nov 11
“As a result, it estimates that Mexico’s traffickers would lose about $1.4 billion of their $2 billion revenues from marijuana. The effect on some groups would be severe: the Sinaloa “cartel” would lose up to half its total income, IMCO reckons. Exports of other drugs, from cocaine to methamphetamine, would become less competitive, as the traffickers’ fixed costs (from torturing rivals to bribing American and Mexican border officials) would remain unchanged, even as marijuana revenues fell. Legalisation could, in short, deal a blow to Mexico’s traffickers of a magnitude that no current policy has got close to achieving. The stoned and sober alike should bear that in mind when they cast their votes on Tuesday.” Legalising marijuana: The view from Mexico | The Economist (via rafer)

(via fred-wilson)


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Nov 2

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Jul 6
“Idleness is not just a vacation, an indulgence or a vice; it is as indispensable to the brain as vitamin D is to the body, and deprived of it we suffer a mental affliction as disfiguring as rickets. The space and quiet that idleness provides is a necessary condition for standing back from life and seeing it whole, for making unexpected connections and waiting for the wild summer lightning strikes of inspiration — it is, paradoxically, necessary to getting any work done.” The ‘Busy’ Trap - NYTimes.com (via michaelikesit)

(via michaelikesit)


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May 16

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Mar 10
bijan:

quite moving. 
reblogged via padbury:


“And suddenly, I looked at the bull. He had this innocence that all animals have in their eyes, and he looked at me with this pleading. It was like a cry for justice, deep down inside of me. I describe it as being like a prayer - because if one confesses, it is hoped, that one is forgiven. I felt like the worst shit on earth.”This photo shows the collapse of Torrero Alvaro Munera, as he realized in the middle of the his last fight… the injustice to the animal. From that day forward he became an opponent of bullfights.

bijan:

quite moving. 

reblogged via padbury:

“And suddenly, I looked at the bull. He had this innocence that all animals have in their eyes, and he looked at me with this pleading. It was like a cry for justice, deep down inside of me. I describe it as being like a prayer - because if one confesses, it is hoped, that one is forgiven. I felt like the worst shit on earth.”

This photo shows the collapse of Torrero Alvaro Munera, as he realized in the middle of the his last fight… the injustice to the animal. From that day forward he became an opponent of bullfights.


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